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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 In Acts 17:23 Paul noticed that the Greeks worshiped God in ignorance and even had an altar to the “unknown god.”  In Romans 1:23 he explained why they did not know God; they had rejected true knowledge of Him.  In Colossians 2:9 he shows where the true knowledge of God lies—in Christ, “for in Him all the fullness of deity dwells in bodily form.”  The Greeks’ knowledge of God had become fragmented into bits and pieces that were less than true deity. Christ shows what they would look like in their original unity.

COMMENTARY, ACTS 17:23, ROM. 1:23, COL. 2:9

The ancients worshiped what they did not know:

Corruptible men and beasts and creeping things

Enthroned in splendor, deathless.  From below,

They scaled the sky with such imaginings,

But for that trip they needed stronger wings.

The glimpses filled their hearts with holy dread;

They could not see the way the King of kings

Joined all the scattered hints into one Head:

Atropos, who snips thread after thread;

Poseidon, master of the raging sea;

Hera of the hearth and marriage bed;

Live-giving power of Persephone;

Aphrodite’s beauty; Ares’ might;

Zeus’s thunder; and Apollo’s light.

The Word

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest book, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis, from Square Halo Books!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

L

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 

It is now the Autumn of 1974 and the beginning of my Middler year in Seminary.  While adding Hebrew to my Greek and gaining additional grounding in biblical studies, theology, and church history, I managed also to find time for some walks in the woods before the onset of another winter and to experiment a bit with enjambment, the art of making your sentences end at different points in your lines of iambic pentameter to avoid predictable monotony and enhance the flow of your sonnet.

 

SONNET XVI

 

It was a deep, dark forest.  No wind stirred

The woven branches there.  No greater sound

In all that heavy stillness could be heard

Than worn-out oak leaves dropping to the ground.

The floor was covered with their rusty brown

As I, not unaffected by the gloom,

Came slowly shuffling through with eyes cast down.

The arching branches, closing in, assumed

The aspect of dim vaults in ancient tombs,

When, sudden, splashed amidst the brown, a small

Bright patch of gold I saw, the earth in bloom,

Where one lone maple’s let her leaf-cloak fall.

Tell me—was it leaves I saw that hour,

Or Zeus descending in a golden shower?

 

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://www.createspace.com/3562314 and order Stars Through the Clouds!

Donald T. Williams, PhD