With the long vacation of summer dawning and no international trip planned for this year, I will be more free to move around the country to speak or preach for the next three months.  So I thought I would remind you of what I have to offer.

3R MINISTRIES

Renaissance:  The restoration of the life of the mind;

Reformation:  The restoration of sound doctrine;

Revival:  The restoration of vital Christian spirituality.

Donald T. Williams, PhD:  Pastor, Professor, Writer, Speaker, Apologist

Renaissance—a restoration of the life of the mind; Reformation—a restoration of sound doctrine; Revival—a restoration of vital Christian spirituality.  These are the three great movements of God we desperately need in our generation.  And our great mistake is to believe that you can have the last one without the first two.”  —  Donald T. Williams

Donald T. Williams, PhD, is one of the foremost apologists and Christian thinkers you may not have heard of.  What makes him unique?  He is a border dweller, camped out on the border between fields of theology and literature, the border between pastoral ministry and serious scholarship, and the border between this world, Narnia, and Middle Earth.

Pastor, professor, and poet, theologian, apologist, and cultural critic, Williams is R. A. Forrest Scholar at Toccoa Falls College in the hills of NE Georgia.  He also serves as Scholar in Residence for Summit Ministries and has served as a pastoral trainer for rural pastors in places like Uganda, Kenya, and India for Church Planting International. He is past president of the International Society of Christian Apologetics.  Williams is the author of eleven books, including Mere Humanity: G. K. Chesterton, C. S. Lewis, and Jr. R. R. Tolkien on the Human Condition (Nashville: Broadman, 2006), Inklings of Reality: Essays Toward a Christian Philosophy of Letters (Lynchburg: Lantern Hollow Press, 2012), Reflections From Plato’s Cave: Essays in Evangelical Philosophy (Lynchburg: Lantern Hollow Press, 2012), Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016), and An Encouraging Thought: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of J. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018).  His articles appear frequently in popular magazines such as Touchstone: A Journal of Mere Christianity and Christian Research Journal as well as various scholarly journals.  He is also one of the featured “talking heads” in the popular recent apologetics video “Mining for God” (www.miningforgod.com).

Donald T. Williams

Williams speaks frequently for churches, colleges, Christian schools, home school groups, campus ministries, and other ministries.  Popular topics include “The Theology of Tolkien’s Middle Earth,” “Why We Lost the Culture War, and How to Make a Comeback,” “Worldviews in Literature,” “The Problem of Evil,” “True Truth: Why We Need to Remember Francis Schaeffer,” and “The Validity of Lewis’s ‘Trilemma.’”  His preaching is expository, in the tradition of men like D. Marty Lloyd-Jones.

To book Dr. Williams for your church, school, or group, contact him at dtw@tfc.edu.

3R Ministries:  Renaissance; Reformation; Revival!

 Donald T. Williams, PhD

381 Talmadge Drive, Toccoa, Ga. 30577;  dtw@tfc.edu

 

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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

Christopher Smart

Christopher Smart was one of those endearing people who lack that little red light that goes off in the back of our heads to tell us that we are doing something socially unacceptable, or at least not expedient at that particular moment.  So if he thought of something he should be praying about, he would drop to his knees and do so then and there—even if it meant blocking the traffic in the public street to which he was oblivious.  He couldn’t understand why this was a problem, and eventually got himself committed to an insane asylum by doing stuff like that.  His friends, fearful of contagion or of public opinion, mostly dropped him like a hot potato—but not Samuel Johnson, who visited him there.  When asked why he had done so, the Doctor gave one of the most admirable, honorable, and inspiring answers in the history of responses:  “I would as lief pray with Kit Smart as any man alive.”  Thatmoment in the history Christian courage deserves a Spenserian Stanza.

FAITHFULNESS

Dr. Johnson would as lief have prayed

With Kit Smart as with any man alive.

So when Smart was summarily betrayed

And sent to an asylum to deprive

Him of the insane temper which could drive

A man to kneeling in the public street,

The Doctor was the first one to arrive.

What did he care what base tongues might repeat?

It seems they had to pray wherever they could meet.

Dr. Samuel Johnson

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!

Donald T. Williams, PhD

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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus sells his soul to the Devil for twenty-four years of ultimate temporal wealth and power.  This curtal sonnet picks him up at the last minute of that period, as Marlowe so brilliantly portrays it.

image-Faust

UNFAITHFUL

He saw Christ’s blood stream through the firmament;

A drop—a half drop—would have saved his soul,

But Faust for comfort turned to Lucifer.

The pain it would have cost him to repent

Was more immediate a threat, all told,

Than what an hour later he’d incur.

 

He could not stop the turning of the spheres

Or even slow the pace at which they rolled.

So much for power!  That had been the spur

To what he, after four and twenty years,

No longer could defer.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and An Encouraging Thought: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of J. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018).

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Book-CSLTheology-Cover

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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.” 

It was the best used bookstore in Northeast Georgia, fueled by the dispersion of the libraries of retiring University of Georgia professors.  You could get classics of scholarship there in every field, not available elsewhere for love or money, at a reasonable price.  Still, on my budget restraint was required, and was achieved with great difficulty.  Unfortunately, it was eventually not a viable business model in our post-literate world.  Requiescat in Pacem.  Now we must pass without even looking.

PURGATORY

Or, Visiting a Rare Book Shop with little Money

In Memoriam: Jackson Street Books, Athens, Georgia

 

“Do not open!” reads the warning

On the annotated glass.

Leather covers, gold adorning

Kept by polished wood and brass.

“Do not touch.  Request assistance”:

Just admiring from a distance

Fortifies my sales resistance.

Virgil, with a mild insistence

Whispers, “Look and pass.”

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!

 

 

231

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

Hugh Latimer

 On his way to be burnt at the stake for the  Gospel, English Reformer Hugh Latimer turned to his companion Nicholas Ridley and said, “Be of good cheer, Master Ridley, and play the man, and we shall this day light such a candle in England as by God’s grace shall never be put out.”  It would almost be worthwhile being martyred to be remembered for a fiery pun like that!  (I said “almost”; don’t get any ideas.)  What makes his courage and defiance especially impressive is that at that moment the future of the light of the Gospel in England looked very dark.  There was no reason to expect that Bloody Mary’s persecution would not extinguish it forever—except one’s faith in the sovereignty and faithfulness of God.

 

LATIMER

The more they smothered it, the more it burned

With courage and unconquerable will,

A candle that could never be put out:

It was a blazing soul which only yearned

To sow the seed of light, and then to till

The soil until the fruit shone all about.

 

He saw what only men of faith can see:

“Play the man, and by God’s grace we will,”

He said, the promise burning through his doubt,

“Light such a candle as shall never be

Put out!”

Latimer & Ridley at the Stake, from Foxe’s Martyrs

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!

Donald T. Williams, PhD