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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 Why is the modern church so spiritually impotent?  Maybe it should pay attention to the biblical idea of what it should be about, and how.

Williams Trying to Make this Point

PRACTICAL ECCLESIOLOGY

Commentary, 1 Cor. 14:26, Col. 3:16

Each member has a place; each one belongs,

As seen when, gathered as a congregation,

They sing their psalms and hymns and holy songs.

Whether two or three or mighty throngs,

The Lord is in their midst.  A priestly nation,

Each member has a place; each one belongs.

The Lord himself with love eternal longs

For them; each one by special invitation

Is singing psalms and hymns and holy songs.

A pincer movement, ministry:  the prongs?

A verse, a prayer, a word of exhortation.

Each member has a place; each one belongs.

How beautiful the feet, the sandal thongs

Which go to every tongue and tribe and nation

Singing psalms and hymns and holy songs.

Spectators passive in their pew?  It wrongs

The vision, suffocates the celebration.

Each member has a place; each one belongs,

Singing psalms and hymns and holy songs.

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!

 

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243

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 Oh, those Brits.  Or is it oh, those colonials?

ACROSS THE POND

“Whilst” instead of “while”;

For “Excuse me,” “Sorry!”

That’s the British style:

A “truck” becomes a “lorry.”

What we call a “conservative”

In England is a “Tory.”

 

Americans “drop by”

While Brits “pop over to.”

No one knows just why.

A “bathroom” is a “loo.”

Americans have to “stand in line,”

While Englishmen just “queue.”

 

We have a “can” for “trash”;

They have a “bin” for “dust.”

We’re “knocked out” when we’re bashed;

The English get “concussed.”

They stay to leftward when they drive

To keep us all nonplussed.

 

Two nations thus divided

By a common tongue—

The rule by which we’re guided,

However far we’re flung:

One of those things the gods decided

When the world was young.

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!

 

 

242

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 The trivium is grammar, logic, and rhetoric.  Why are they the foundation of all learning?  Because grammar is the art of how to say something, logic of how to say something valid, and rhetoric of how to say something well, applied to what Matthew Arnold called “the best that has been thought and done in the world.”  Our own educational system has not improved since we moved it off of that foundation.

THE GOAL OF THE TRIVIUM

Commentary, Proverbs 9:1-6

Old mysteries await fresh revelation.

Such ideas ought of right to be presented

In royal garments, rich and ornamented,

Befitting their high lineage and station.

Heraldic manuscript illumination

In Celtic knotwork swirled and brightly tinted

For metaphors and the meanings they have hinted:

The setting beckons us, an invitation.

 

What now seems quaint and esoteric lore

Was once the simple bedrock of our thought:

First principles and their elucidation.

That’s partly what the wondrous words were for—

Despite our darkness, they can still be caught:

Faint echoes of the ancient Conversation.

This post is highly logical.

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!

241

 Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 Dante meets Piccarda in one of the lower circles of Heaven and wonders how she can be happy knowing that so many saints are higher than she experiencing even greater happiness.  She explains that all the saints in Heaven are filled with joy to their capacity, which will increase forever—and besides, his question misses the point.  The bottom line is profound for anyone who actually loves God above all, and shows us how far we actually are from that place if it does not satisfy us:  “His will is our peace.”

WHAT DANTE LEARNED FROM

PICCARDA DEI DONATI

“How is it you, sequestered from the bliss

Which animates those higher yet above

Who, like the blessed lady Beatrice,

Dwell even closer to the Source of Love—

How can it be that you are not disturbed;

How can you be content to languish here?”

“And have your passions never once been curbed

By the power of a greater love?  I fear

That you will find it hard to comprehend

The elemental lessons of this school:

The grammar of the knee that joys to bend

Before the stronger god who comes to rule.

Our bliss is full, yet ever will increase,

For we are His, and His will is our peace.”

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!

 

240

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 Anyone who has been there knows why this iconic building is a symbol of Oxford University.

THE RADCLIFFE CAMERA

(Part of the Bodleian Library, Oxford)

The lamp of learning never shone so bright

As there beneath that artificial sky,

The dome of the Radcliffe Camera, graced with light.

That soaring weightlessness of blue and white

Shot through with gold from skylights lifted high:

The lamp of learning never shone so bright.

Not truly weightless, all that stony height:

In the crypt, squat, hunkering arches underlie

The dome of the Radcliffe Camera, graced with light.

The Crypt

There rooted firm, those arches ground their might:

Theology and letters; that is why

The lamp of learning never shone so bright.

That weight of learning buried out of sight

Was what allowed the mind to soar and fly

In the dome of the Radcliffe Camera, graced with light.

Here one might mount a search for what is right,

To extricate the true thought from the lie.

The lamp of learning never shone so bright:

The dome of the Radcliffe Camera, graced with light.

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!