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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.” I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

Arthur’s kingdom fell because Lancelot and Guinnevere did not make the choices I imagine for them in this poem. We can choose integrity over passion, faithfulness over desire. Will we? They tragically did not.

LANCELOT AND GUINNEVERE: HOW IT OUGHT TO HAVE BEEN
(Taliessin Indulgeth in Wishful Thinking)

Two minds and hearts amazingly akin:
Begot by Chastity upon Desire,
They burned with both divine and earthly fire.
Matured already e’er it could begin,
It seemed their love had simply always been.
But it had not. They found themselves with prior
Loyalties that asked to be held higher,
But loved each other as they hated sin.

Nothing could turn their fire into ice;
Their sacred vows they’d not consent to break.
“I will not rate thee at a lower price,”
He said, “Nor thee nor virtue will forsake,
And this must be my costly sacrifice.”
There really was no other choice to make.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)! Order from the publisher or Amazon.

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268

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 C. S. Lewis is known for the Argument from Reason. If our thought processes just evolved randomly, and our minds were not created in the image of a rational and personal God, then why should we trust the thoughts are minds were randomly evolved by chance to have—including the ones about evolution? The fact that we can think rationally and that our thoughts can correspond to reality—not just to physical aspects of it that we get through our senses but to laws and principles—is a great mystery, however you slice it.

C. S. Lewis, his thoughts corresponding to reality.

THOUGHT

Whence comes a reason’s power to convince,

Illuminate the searching intellect

With sudden serendipity of sense?

No change of chemicals or elements

Could equal insight, letting us detect

Whence comes a reason’s power to convince.

Electrical impulses give no hints,

Yield nothing that could lead us to expect

A sudden serendipity of sense.

A chain of neurons firing boldly prints

Its trace upon a screen which can’t reflect

Whence comes a reason’s power to convince.

By faith we must accept this light that glints.

The eye can’t see itself, cannot inspect

Its sudden serendipity of sense.

A mystery much like the sacraments

Whose grace unseen we yet do not reject:

Whence comes a reason’s power to convince?

From sudden serendipity of sense.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!  Order from the publisher or Amazon.

267

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

There was a time when people played games involving strategy that did not involve mashing buttons on their phones.  You don’t actually have to go all the way back to Arthurian Britain to find such things, but in my Arthurian poetry I imagine Taliessin, the king’s bard, doing it, just because I can.

TALIESSIN PLAYETH AT CHESS

A pawn moves out to open up a lane

Which might allow a bishop to advance.

Three moves ahead–at least–anticipate!

Beware the lurking knight.  He lurks in vain;

The square he wants is covered.  With a glance,

We spot potential weakness.  So, we wait.

 

If we can bring just one more piece to bear,

The trap is ready.  So proceeds the dance.

If not perceived until it is too late,

This seemingly inconsequential square . . .

“Checkmate!”

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!  Order from the publisher or Amazon.

266

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

SCENE

The rain comes driving, slanting through the mist.

The trees and sky, a blur of grey and green:

Impressionistic brush-strokes on the screen

By a Chinese artisan with dancing wrist.

And there, beneath a sheltering tree, the tryst.

Oblivious to the weather, they are keen

On what from words and glances one may glean:

She lifts her face up to her knight, is kissed.

 

The raindrop and the teardrop on the cheek

Are mingled, flowing in the self-same track.

And are they tears of joy?  The sky is bleak.

It seems their kiss has sealed a solemn pact:

He lifts her to his steed; away they streak;

They fade into the mist, do not look back.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!  Order from the publisher or Amazon.

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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

REVELATION: NATURAL, SPECIAL

Commentary, Rom. 1:18-23, 2:14-16

Inscribed upon the stars and in our bones

Is truth we know so well and yet suppress.

The hardest tablets are not made of stone.

In spite of all we say that we condone,

Conscience whispers softly nonetheless

Of Laws within the stars and in our bones.

We drown the Voice with chatter; on we drone.

It calls us back, but still we will digress:

The hardest tablets were not made of stone.

When Moses climbed the Mountain all alone,

A Finger into slabs of rock impressed

What stood upon the stars and in our bones.

Before he could get back, they would be thrown

To break against the flint within our breasts:

The hardest tablets were not made of stone.

Part of Creation’s universal groan,

The Voice will not be stilled, for still it rests

Inscribed upon the stars and in our bones:

The hardest tablets are not made of stone.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!  Order from the publisher or Amazon.