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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on “ the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

 Two-plus of the remaining decades mentioned below are now already gone.  And I thought they were disappearing in a hurry back then!

Memento Mori — Reminder of What is Coming

UBI SUNT?

Four decades and a half have disappeared;

They vanished in the twinkling of an eye.

And now, the three or four that may remain

Are poised to follow.  It is to be feared

They’ll hardly say “Hello” before they fly.

Some subtly altered circuits in the brain

Are the only legacy they leave behind:

It’s what they’re literally remembered by.

And even that inheritance would be vain

If those faint traces vanish with the mind.

If anything survives, it’s understood

That there are yet some changes that I would

Accomplish if I can before I die.

Donald T. Williams, PhD

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!  Order from the publisher or Amazon.

 

 

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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

Christian ministry takes many forms.  Trinity Fellowship had a rich ministry in the 1990s before succumbing to some negative demographics.  The coffee-house ministry opened on a Good Friday.

OPENING NIGHT

For Jason Franklin and the Staff,

Corinthian Coffee House Ministries

An Evangelistic Outreach of Trinity Fellowship, Toccoa

Headlights through the lattice, shadows flicker,

Mix with smell of java, candle light;

Above the hum of conversation, laughter;

A string band playing on into the night.

The Cross still standing in its central perch

Is the only sign that we are in a church.

 

The chairs are not in rows, surround the tables;

The pulpit and the altar, moved aside,

Await their restoration Sunday morning;

Meanwhile the Bridegroom searches for His bride.

The shadows flicker, move toward the back

To find the Cross that stands there draped in black.

 

Good Friday evening stretches on toward Easter.

The church transformed into a coffee house

Breathes an atmosphere soft and romantic:

‘Tis thus the holy Bridegroom woos his spouse.

The Cross, amidst the circling lattice-lights,

By Sunday morning will be wearing white.

The Band at Corinthian Coffee House

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!  Order from the publisher or Amazon.

Donald T. Williams, PhD

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Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

With the Holidays behind us, we return to our more or less chronological history of what trying to be a poet has taught us.  Why do we write?  This is as good an explanation as I have been able to come up with.  Jaime Fredericks was a student of mine some years ago, and is a very good writer of fantasy in her own right.

C. S. Lewis’s Writing Desk

THE UNDISCOVERED COUNTRY

For Jaime Fredericks, Fellow Explorer

The mind is poised; the fingers grip the pen.

Ahead, the unexplored expanse of white

Lies peaceful, undisturbed—invites you in.

No one can tell what wondrous things you might

Encounter once the journey has begun.

The hidden chambers of the human heart,

That labyrinth that is fully known by none,

Lie perilously open once you start.

Solar systems far beyond our ken;

Dragons, wizards, elves, and warriors bold;

The desperate lives of ordinary men;

All the untold tales that must be told,

And any one might pick you for its Mage!

The grand adventure of the empty page.

Dr. Williams working on his next book

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books: Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and “An Encouraging Thought”: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of L. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018)!  Order from the publisher or Amazon.

Bethlehem

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

While Christmas is still fresh in our minds, let us ponder the fact that Bethlehem in Hebrew (Beth Lechem) means “House of Bread.”  And so, some two millennia ago, it came to be.  The poem was first published in New Oxford Review, Jan.-Feb., 1982, p. 31.

Not the actual scene of the manger, but one in Bethlehem much like it.

Bethlehem

Sonnet XXXII

Bethlehem, Beth Lechem, House of Bread:

Your white stones waited silent in the sun

For long years (long as people feel them run).

The prophets wrote no more; the Rabbis read

The old words and unraveled every thread

And found your secret out:  You were the one.

Yet when the time can and the thing was done,

They spent the night at home asleep in bed.

 

Oh, they could put their fingers on the pages

That told the old fox Herod it was you.

But those uncircumcised, stargazing sages

Came first, and shepherds, wet with evening dew

Had long since been there, and had all been fed

In Bethlehem, Beth Lechem, House of Bread.

The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ other books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And don’t miss his newest offerings:  Deeper Magic: The Theology Behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016), and An Encouraging Thought: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of J. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018).

The Old, Old Story

Wordsworth wrote an endless poem in blank verse on” the growth of a poet’s mind.”  I shall attempt a more modest feat for a more distracted age: a blog, “Things which a Lifetime of Trying to Be a Poet has Taught Me.”

Let’s see if we can put ourselves back into the scene of the old, well-known story of Christmas so that its full impact hits us again, despite our familiarity with its details.  Naturally, a Petrarchan Sonnet is just the way to do that.

 THE IRONY

The shepherds had no word for paradox

(A learned term), but scratching of the head

Was something that they knew, and as they sped

Toward Bethlehem, abandoning their flocks,

And stumbling in their haste upon the rocks,

They did some over what the angel’d said:

Messiah in a manger for a bed?

A king whose courtiers were ass and ox?

 

Perhaps the biggest part of the surprise

Was that they were the ones who should be told:                                                                                This

This Savior did not seem to fit the mold

Constructed by the Mighty and the Wise.

To stable smells and angels’ caroling,

Condemned and incognito came the King.

Remember: for more poetry like this, go to https://lanternhollow.wordpress.com/store/ and order Stars Through the Clouds! Also look for Inklings of Reality and Reflections from Plato’s Cave, Williams’ newest books from Lantern Hollow Press: Evangelical essays in pursuit of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty.  And look for Williams’ very latest books, Deeper Magic: The Theology behind the Writings of C. S. Lewis (Baltimore: Square Halo Books, 2016) and An Encouraging Thought: The Christian Worldview in the Writings of J. R. R. Tolkien (Cambridge, OH: Christian Publishing House, 2018).

Donald T. Williams, PhD